Mentoring Programs

Team Mentoring for New Faculty

The Team Mentoring program is designed to help new faculty (protégés) progress professionally by getting the information you need and by establishing enduring relationships with peers and with a mentor. Team Mentoring will reduce isolation and increase connection by building a true cohort of protégés and helping you connect with some of the most supportive faculty across campus.

In the fall semester, protégés meet regularly with one of the peer mentoring teams led by Martha Mitchell, chemical and materials engineering professor, and Tara Gray, criminal justice professor and Teaching Academy director. Protégés will also read a book, Advice for New Faculty Members, by Robert Boice. And protégés meet with three senior faculty that you choose with help from Tara.

By spring, each protégé will invite one faculty member to serve as a mentor. During the spring, this mentoring relationship will include five discussions after exchanges of syllabi, classroom observations, research papers, research agendas, and CVs or annual performance evaluations.

What participants say about Team Mentoring for Faculty New to NMSU
My mentor was the best in the west, the southwest and beyond. She was engaging, reflective, and intuitive. Her questions to me, over our lunches, were sensitive, probing and they made me think–for hours and days after we met. We shared syllabi and vitaes, and she came to a class of mine and observed my students and my style. Her class visit provoked some great discussion between us. She was extremely valuable to me as I explored my college, other colleges, and the university as a whole, while coming to better understand the tenure process. She aided me in creating a more global form of thinking about NMSU, academia in general, and how there can be a powerful and effective blending of the university and community. It was a wonderful partnership that evolved into a friendship.

The Team Mentoring program has been extremely helpful to me. It has provided a structure within which I can work toward improving my research, teaching and service to the University. It also really forced me to think through who would be a good mentor, and to interview potential mentors, instead of simply taking it for granted. Although I initially did not really think that I would benefit much from a classroom visitation, I got a lot of valuable information about my teaching from my mentor, who facilitated a mini-feedback session in my class with my students. Likewise, I visited hers and found out some useful things about how to approach my own classes. Also, we are sharing our research and providing feedback. Having someone outside of your field to critique your writing is very instructive. My mentor, having recently gone through the tenure process, will be helping me to shape my dossier. I congratulate the staff of the Teaching Academy for implementing Team Mentoring, and hope that it continues to become a natural part of faculty development at NMSU.

One-on-One Faculty Mentoring Program

The One-on-One Faculty Mentoring Program is a peer mentoring program for faculty and academic administrators. The program promotes professional development by connecting mentees with others who can advise, coach and guide them, as well as help them understand the NMSU context.

The program aims to provide both mentors and mentees with the chance to feel more connected to NMSU by this person-to-person commitment and to develop a network among the larger group in the program.

Mentor Expectation Worksheet
Mentee Expectation Worksheet
Mentoring Agreement

What participants say about One-on-One Mentoring

My mentor has helped me tremendously to better understand academia and to navigate the different roles of a faculty member.

My Teaching Academy mentor has inspired me so much by his helpful and insightful advice.

I am extremely grateful to have been paired with my mentor. She has truly enriched my experience at NMSU.

 

Getting the Edge in Academe: A Ph.D. Is Not Enough

The Getting the Edge program is designed to help RISE and other doctoral students progress professionally by getting the information you need and by establishing enduring relationships with peers and with a mentor. Getting the Edge will reduce isolation and increase connection by building a true cohort of protégés and helping you connect with some of the most supportive faculty across campus.

Throughout the fall semester, protégés meet regularly with the cohort led by biology professor and RISE co-PI, Graciela Unguez. Getting the Edge is supported by the NIH RISE Program.

Topics to be discussed include:

• Networking
• Professional talks
• Getting published
• Getting funding
• Getting jobs/postdocs

This program is supported by NIH NIGMS Grant #R25GM061222

What participants say about Getting the Edge: A Ph.D. is Not Enough

Make time for this workshop, it will inspire you to start the next step of your [academic] career.

This workshop makes you very aware of the [academic] job application process. Absolutely helpful.